Photo Show: theprintspace Photovoice Awards London winner announced tomorrow

Grow Heathrow Jonathan Goldberg

Grow Heathrow © Jonathan Goldberg

As promised, a quick post to wish Jonathan Goldberg, a former Tri-Pod workshop participant, and Zoe Childerley the best of luck at theprintspace Photovoice Awards tomorrow.

JONATHAN GOLDBERG
Jonathan will be showing work at theprintspace Photovoice Awards exhibition of shortlisted photographers running from 21 August until 1 September at theprintspace gallery in London. The overall winner will be announced tomorrow (Thursday 20 August).

Of his series, Jonathan says: “There is a unique place close to Britain’s busiest airport called Grow Heathrow. What started as a site for activists protesting against runway expansion has evolved into a complex eco-village that is home to 20 or so people. They live off sustainable energy utilizing wind and solar power, and eat food that they have grown or skipped.”

Grow Heathrow

Grow Heathrow. © Jonathan Goldberg

“As I stepped through the gates at Grow Heathrow for the first time, I saw a utopian society in which money is of secondary importance, and the needs of the community are emphasized over individual requirements. Revisiting the site on many occasions since, however, I have become aware of the hardships of living in a place not blessed with central heating in winter, and lacking the comforts of a conventional modern lifestyle. Through my visits I have got to know some of the occupants and tried to document the lives of people that are determined to live in a way which challenges the norm.”

All print sales will raise funds for Photovoice.

Grow Heathrow

Grow Heathrow. © Jonathan Goldberg

Grow Heathrow

Grow Heathrow. © Jonathan Goldberg

Grow Heathrow

Grow Heathrow. © Jonathan Goldberg

Grow HeathrowGrow Heathrow

Grow Heathrow. © Jonathan Goldberg

Photo Show: theprintspace PhotoVoice Awards shortlisted series on show in London

Brother Paul, member of the Archulettaville Commune. Zoe Childerley.

Brother Paul, member of the Archulettaville Commune. Zoe Childerley.

It’s been a long time since I posted here. There are many reasons for this, both personal and professional, but I am still here and have some exciting news re: work coming up that I will share in the next couple of weeks. For now, I want to share some good news regarding a photographer who I have worked with through Tri-Pod, Zoe Chiderley. Also, good luck to Jonathan Goldberg, who also attended a Tri-Pod workshop, and has a series currently showing at Brighton station commissioned for the One Planet City organised in partnership with Fotodocument and the Brighton Photo Biennial 2014.

Hippy Days Festival. © Zoe Childerley

Hippy Days Festival. © Zoe Childerley

commune--10

Leon in his greenhouse, Libre Commune. © Zoe Childerley.

ZOE CHILDERLEY
Zoe will be showing work at theprintspace Photovoice Awards exhibition of shortlisted photographers running from 21 August until 1 September at theprintspace gallery in London. The overall winner will be announced next week on Thursday 20 August. The Commune series was produced during an artist residency in America. All print sales will raise funds for Photovoice.

commune--6

Betsy at home, Libre Commune. © Photo Zoe Childerley.

commune--8

Goats at the Shii Koeii Community. © Zoe Childerley.

The shortlist for theprintspace PhotoVoice Awards... |.pdf

Photo News – Magnum summer documentary photo course in London

POLAND. MILIK. December 2004.

Photo: Mark Power POLAND. MILIK. December 2004.

G.B. ENGLAND. Manchester. Moss Side Estate. 1986.

Photo: Stuart Franklin  G.B. ENGLAND. Manchester. Moss Side Estate. 1986.

Magnum Photos is running an intensive 21-day Documentary Photography Course in association with London College of Communication over the month of August. That’s great news but there is a catch—the cost of the course is £3,000, which is equivalent to a year’s tuition fees in some universities (not LCC), so it will be interesting to see what the take up for the course is like and who attends. However, I can’t find any information in the press release about the maximum group size.

The 21-day course will teach students how to successfully develop a documentary photo project from start to finish and will run from 7-27 August (Monday-Friday 10.00-17.00). Teaching will be led by award-winning Magnum photographers Mark Power, who joined the agency in 2002 and is currently Professor of Photography at the University of Brighton, and Stuart Franklin, who joined the agency in 1985, as well as the College’s staff, including Anne Williams and Max Houghton.

POLAND. POBIEROWO.  September 2008.

Photo: Mark Power POLAND. POBIEROWO. September 2008.

“During this three-week course, students will become absorbed in the practice and history of documentary photography and Magnum’s legacy and contemporary contribution to it. The course will consider all elements of successful project development; from research phases, to access and shooting, to the editing and creation of a final body of work for public display.

The course will consist of these main elements:
 Shooting on location – daily assignments and briefs in London
 Lectures – led by Magnum photographers and LCC staff
 Critique – individually and in groups, looking at technique, subject and personal voice
 Editing & production – learning how editing, sequencing and design can reveal narrative
 Magnum Print Room – you will spend a weekend learning the mechanics of the photography business,
networking and career development
 Graduation party –celebrate and display work digitally to a public and industry audience.

The learning outcomes connected to the course are:
 Create an industry standard and academically informed body of photographic work
 Have unique insight into the history of documentary photography
 Engage in critical debates on ethics, industry and technology in contemporary photographic practice
 Continue developing essential skills in writing, editing and making work for different audiences.

“For over sixty years, Magnum’s international photographers have chronicled the world; helping to shape documentary photography as a modern form of both artistic expression and a tool for change. As a modern agency, the current preoccupation is focused on the role of authorship in an image-saturated world.

“In conjunction with Magnum’s historic archive, a new means of culturally relevant production is being explored, leading to a greater dialogue with the wider market, expanded platforms and emerging geographies. With over six decades of experience and with access to world-leading photographers and professionals, Magnum Photos is committed in the transfer of its accumulated knowledge to a new generation of visual storytellers.” From the press release.

Photo Show: Drawn by Light from The Royal Photographic Society Collection to open at the National Media Museum Bradford

Fading Away, Henry Peach Robinson, 1858
Fading Away, 1858, Henry Peach Robinson (1830-1901)
© The Royal Photographic Society Collection at National Media Museum/SSPL

 
Photographic archives and collections are priceless treasures capturing moments in time as well as providing a chronicle of the history and development of the medium. The Royal Photographic Society (RPS) Collection is one such example and is part of The National Photography Collection at the National Media Museum in Bradford which is widely regarded as a collection of collections. As with The National Photography Collection, the RPS incorporates both aesthetic and technical developments as well as key images by some of the most influential photographers of our time.

The National Media Museum, which cares for the Royal Photographic Society Collection on behalf of the nation, is exhibiting more than 250 highlights and treasures ranging from the birth of photography to the present day in the exhibition, Drawn by Light: The Royal Photographic Society Collection. The show will run from 20 March until 21 June 2015, so there is plenty of time to see it.

For this post, I spoke to Associate Curator Brian Liddy (BL) at the National Media Museum where the RPS Collection is housed to find out why such photography collections are important and to share some of the hidden photographic gems in the Collection.

MG: You acquired the collection, which consists of over 250,000 images and artefacts from the last 150 years of photography, in 2003. Is this figure still accurate? Have there been any recent additions to the RPS collection?
Brian Liddy (BL): Unlike most of the collections that make up the National Collection, the RPS collection is not ‘closed’ and we work in partnership with the RPS to add to it. An obvious example is that anything we acquire from RPS members and former RPS members or presidents goes into the collection. In the past we have also added Madame Yevonde photographs to complement the set that were already part of the RPS collection. One of the most recent acquisitons is Steve McCurry’s Afghan Girl, which was added to the collection in November 2014.

MG: When you say that you acquired the collection, does that mean that it was given as a donation, or was some payment made for it?
BL: In June 2002 a Heritage Lottery Fund grant of £3.75 million was announced (at the time the largest ever HLF grant), together with a grant of £342,000 from the National Art Collections Fund (Art Fund) and funding from Yorkshire Forward for the transfer of The Society’s collection to the National Media Museum.

MG: When did the first digitised photos from the RPS Collection go online?
BL: The digitisation of images in the RPS Collection started as soon as we received it and many can be seen online on our own website or the Science and Society Picture Library website. It is an ongoing task we’re constantly adding more.

MG: Who pays for the Collection to be looked after and put online?
BL: Funding for the care of the collection is predominantly from the grant-in-aid we receive from DCMS – it is the National Collection and as such belongs to the Nation. It is Museum staff who look after it.

The Onion Field', George Davison, 1890
The Onion Field, 1890, Photograph taken using a pinhole camera, George Davison (1854-1930)
© The Royal Photographic Society Collection at National Media Museum/SSPL

 
MG: Which three key images in the RPS Collection do you think are particularly important and why?
BL: Three key images are Alfred Stieglitz’s The Steerage (1907), which is considered, and debated, to be the first ‘modern’ photograph. George Davidson’s The Onion Field (1890). This image started the fight that led to the Photo-secession movement and William Henry Fox Talbot’s Portrait of Talbot’s Wife, Constance (1840) which is the first true photographic portrait. My personal favourite is Roger Fenton’s Aira Force, Ullswater (1860) because it’s just a beautiful photograph.

Aira Force, Ullswater, Roger Fenton, 1860

Aira Force, Ullswater, 1860, Albumen print, Roger Fenton (1819-1869)
© The Royal Photographic Society Collection at National Media Museum/SSPL

 
MG: Which is the earliest photo in the collection?
BL: The earliest is Joseph Nicéphore Niépce’s Un Clair de Lune – a pewter plate from c. 1827 showing the first and only known example of a photographic process invented by Niépce. The discovery was announced at the Museum in 2010.

Un Clair de Lune (unframed)

Un Clair de Lune, c 1827, Photograph on pewter, Joseph Nicéphore Niépce, (1765-1833)
© The Royal Photographic Society Collection at National Media Museum/SSPL

 
MG: Which better-known photographers’ work is in the collection, for example, for example, Julia Margaret Cameron?
BL: Alfred Stieglitz, Edward Steichen, Roger Fenton, Frederick H Evans, Peter Henry Emerson to name just a few.

MG: Why is it important to have a National Photo Collection, in particular what does the RPS Collection add to the overall collection?
BL: Photography affects every part of people’s lives on a fundamental basis. Without photography we wouldn’t have television, cinema, the masses of images we have online today. The National Collection cares for the objects and images that have created this history so it can be shared with everyone and preserved for future generations.

Separately, both the National Media Museum and the RPS had very significant collections in their own right, but when the two came together it was ‘hand in glove’. Where we were under-represented, or there were gaps in the National Collection, they were strong; and vice versa. It could not have been a better match.

MG: How important, in your view, is it that people know about such collections and how important is it that people look at such collections physically as opposed to online?
BL: Digitisation and viewing images online obviously makes the Collection more accessible to more people, and is therefore very important. However I would always recommend seeing the objects in person whenever possible, particularly items like daguerreotypes and autochromes as I’ve never yet seen a photographic reproduction that comes close to the real thing. The exhibition, Drawn by Light gives a perfect opportunity to do that, although the collection can also be visited by prior appointment.

Constance Talbot, WHF Talbot, 1840

Constance Talbot, c 1840, Salt paper print from a calotype negative, William Henry Fox Talbot
© The Royal Photographic Society Collection at National Media Museum/SSPL

 
MG: Do many people visit the RPS Collection?
BL: I’d say almost every single visitor to the Insight research centre at the Museum will be shown an item from the RPS  Collection. They’ll either request to see something, we’ll suggest it, or it will make up part of their general visit. The Collection also features in many of our photography exhibitions which are seen by thousands of people each year.

Drawn by Light is co-curated by Colin Harding Curator of Photography and Photographic Technology at the National Media Museum; Claude W. Sui, Curator; and Stephanie Herrmann, Associate Curator, of the Forum of International Photography of the Reiss-Engelhorn-Museen, Mannheim, Germany. Drawn by Light first appeared at Media Space in the Science Museum and is presented in collaboration with the Reiss-Engelhorn-Museen, where it will go on display in 2017.

Visit the Collection
Appointments are available during the third week of the month from Monday – Friday, 10am-1pm and 2pm-5pm. To book, contact the Collections Access Assistant by emailing: research@nationalmediamuseum.org.uk.
Or write to Collections Access Assistant, National Media Museum, Bradford, BD1 1NQ. Places are limited, so please give us as much notice as possible to avoid disappointment.

Free Guided Tours
These take place from Tuesday-Thursday at 1pm. Places are limited, so please book in advance by contacting the box office on 0844 856 3797.
Visiting The RPS Collection.

Photo Books – Open call for books for On Landscape #2 London

IMG_8750

 

ON LANDSCAPE # 2 OPEN CALL FOR BOOKS
On Landscape #2 seeks to instigate a series of discussions, raise questions and incite debate on representations of landscape. A central element of On Landscape Project consists of a library of self-published, hand-made or short-run artists books relating to representations of landscape.

To this end, the On Landscape team (Dafna Talmor, Emma Wieslander and Minna Kantonen) is calling for submissions with a deadline of 16 February. The books will be chosen by Chiara Capodici and Fiorenza Pinna of 3/3, Gianpaolo Arena of Landscape Stories, Matèria’s gallery director Niccolò Fano and the On Landscape Project team. The book display aims to provide a platform for wider debates around landscape whilst presenting an opportunity for a range of practitioners to showcase their work.

The books from On Landscape #2 will add to a selection of titles stemming from the first edition of On Landscape Project last year, for which I chose titles with Bruno Ceschel from Self Publish Be Happy. It was a real treat to sift through over a hundred books and the diversity in terms of approach and design was notable. This selection was showcased in March 2014 at Yinka Shonibare’s Guest Projects in London and was a popular aspect of the show. See images below.IMG_8759 IMG_8752 IMG_8740 IMG_8748 IMG_8758 IMG_8735 IMG_8760 IMG_8756
All iPhone photos. Miranda Gavin

This year, titles from both editions of the project will be showcased within Matèria’s gallery space between April 17 and May 16, 2015 where photographic works by Dafna Talmor, Emma Wieslander and Minna Kantonen, (founders of On Landscape Project) will be on show.

DEADLINE
16 February 2015

SUBMISSION FORM
Click here