Photo Shows: Knock Knock with Jane Hilton at The Jerwood Gallery and Virginia Arendt and Roger Mavity at The Avenue

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© Jane Hilton from Dead Eagle Trail

KNOCK KNOCK AT THE JERWOOD GALLERY HASTINGS
Catch some of Jane Hilton‘s intimate and beautifully-articulated photographic portraits of cowboys (from Dead Eagle Trail) at the newly-reopened Jerwood Gallery in Hastings. Knock Knock showcases seven artists: Fiona Banner, Becky Beasley, Stephen Buckley, Jane Hilton, Martin Maloney, Alessandro Raho and Mario Rossi. All of whom “operate internationally and have strong affiliations to Hastings, either living, working or playing in the vicinity. The show is curated by artist, Professor Gerard Hemsworth.  The show runs until 17 April.

And if you want to know more about Jane’s work, I just came across a PDF of my interview with Jane for Hotshoe magazine back in 2010 on the Schilt Publishing website. You can click on it, download and read at your leisure.

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It was a fab interview to do and I can’t wait for her next series, Precious (a photographic study of working girls in Nevada) to be published this spring as a book. From what I’ve already seen, it promises to be just as fine.

VIRGINIA ARENDT AND ROGER MAVITY AT THE AVENUE
Avenue InvitationThe Avenue Restaurant in London provides the backdrop for a show of two very different bodies of work by photographers Virginia Arendt and Roger Mavity. The show runs until 30 March.

Virginia Arendt’s shows Forecast which explores “the same stretch of Sussex coastline but in different weather and different times of day” and Trees, for which Arendt “takes nature and transforms it into sculpture”.

In contrast, Roger Mavity’s photography reflects his interest in surrealist art: “Photographers usually make images of the real world they see with their eyes: I make images of the surreal world I see with my mind.” Thus, Model Society uses mannequins and real people to create ambiguous realities while Lost in Space takes the theme of isolation and shows a lone woman in deserted spaces such as Battersea Power Station.

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