Help Kickstart Pierfranceso Celada’s book Hitoride, or By Yourself, Alone

After a five-year journey, I am very glad to present the project Hitoride in book form. You can make it a reality by pre-ordering your copy, or getting one of the limited edition offerings.
Pierfranceso Celada

cover

I get news of a fair few crowdfunding campaigns, some of which are by lesser-known photographers who need support in pushing out their campaigns further. Pierfrancesco Celada‘s Kickstarter is one such campaign. I first came across the project a couple of years ago at a Brighton-based Slideluck event and singled out his work as one of my favourite multimedia pieces in the selection. See previous post about his film Japan I wish I knew your name

Now you can help him produce the book for which he has just eight more days to reach his target. You can make a pledge and/or circulate news of his campaign to others. Follow this link to the Kickstarter campaign page HITORIDE. The book will be printed and distributed from Italy. For this project to receive its funding it must raise at least £12,000 by 9 Dec 2014 18:41. To date he has raised £4,513, so a big push is needed.

japan, I wish I knew your name
03_celada_hitoride
japan, I wish I knew your name

HITORIDE (Literally: By Yourself, Alone) is a photographic book by the Italian photographer and is based on his award-winning project Japan I wish I knew your name. The project reflects on miscommunication and isolation in Japan, one of the most populated countries in the world.

The book will cost £24, plus shipping costs. A selection of five limited edition prints from the project will be available for backers to choose from and will be available in three different sizes.

01_celada_hitoride

Pierfrancesco Celada (b.1979, Italy), after completing a PhD in Biomechanics is now concentrating his attention on a long-term project on life in Modern Megalopolis.In 2011 he won the Ideastap and Magnum Photo Photographic Award and interned at Magnum Photo.  His work has been exhibited internationally and his projects published on Newsweek, Times Lightbox, Amica, D-LaRepubblica among others. He is currently working on the second chapter of Modern Megalopolis: “People Mountain People Sea” exploring life in Chinese Megacities. For enquiries: photo@pierfrancescocelada.com

06_celada_hitoride

The Tokyo-Nagoya-Osaka Megalopolis, also called Taiheiyō Belt is a unique example of urban agglomeration with an estimated population of over 80 million people. Despite this incredibly high number of chances to interact, it seems that society is moving in the opposite direction.

If, in small societies, people have more of an active social role, with multiple connections and greater effect on the community [Eriksen, 2001]; in a larger society some people struggle to communicate with each other, or tend to maintain close contact with only a small number of the closest friends or family members. Some people tend to privilege other communicative systems offered by modern media and communication tools; others have an even more extreme approach.

“Nobody is ‘together’ in his work.” Ueyama Kazuki

Hikikomori (“pulling away, being confined”) is an acute social withdrawal phenomenon; a Japanese term that defines reclusive people who have decided to socially isolate themselves for periods longer then six month; often these time periods can be counted in years or even decades. It is estimated that 1% of the Japanese population may be Hikikomori. The young people portrayed in this project are all members of Newstart, a NPO working with Hikikomori and NEET (people not in education, employment or training) with the purpose of helping them to re-enter society.

japan, I wish I knew your name

All photos © Pierfrancesco Celada.

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