Category Archives: Photographers

Keep Photofusion Moving: support the crowdfunding campaign now

Anthony Carr, Big Bar Lake Ranch Revisited, 2014

Anthony Carr, Big Bar Lake Ranch Revisited, 2014

Today I want to point readers to a crowdfunding campaign for Photofusion photography centre in Brixton London that is very dear to my heart. To date, the campaign is currently at £28,185 of a target of £40,000 with 29 days but we still need to push for more as it’s an all-or-nothing-campaign and ends on 2 June at 16.25.

There have been 212 backers so far including renowned photographer Wolfgang Tillmans who pledged an amazing £1,500 last week. If the momentum keeps up at this rate Photofusion’s campaign should meet its target but we need to keep letting people know. So please share this post and the campaign link: Keep Photofusion Moving.

Today I’m going to Photofusion to be filmed on camera regarding why I think Photofusion is important. That’s easy to answer, particularly as I have been involved with the organisation in a variety of capacities over the last decade.

I judge the annual Hotshoe Photofusion award—now in its seventh year— and via this have supported a number of emerging photographers who are also members of Photofusion. The winners from 2010-2015 are:

Anthony Carr (2015)
Lucia Pizanni (2014)
Katerina Mudronova (2013)
Liane Lang (2012)
Chloe Sells (2011)
Odette England (2010)

Photofusion is a hub, a place to meet, to take risks, to experiment, to discuss and to create. It has a mentoring and professional programme, SELECT and has hosted numerous exhibitions by many, now well-known, photographers in the early days of their career. I have also delivered and chaired talks, have been writing for its website and use the darkroom and digital scanning facilities to create personal work.

Please spread the word, share this campaign and Keep Photofusion Moving.

LuciaPizanni

Impronta series, 2103 by Lucia Pizanni, Collodion wet plates on aluminium

 

 

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Kickstarter Crowdfunding call for Alma Haser’s photo book Cosmic Surgery

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The book cover

It will be a photo book set in a fictional, not too distant future, at a point where “intelligent materials” are just about to transform the world of cosmetic surgery.

Today, I want to point readers of this blog to a crowdfunding campaign Cosmic Surgery Kickstarter by Alma Haser that has just six days to go.

Patient no. 16' Print

Patient no. 16′ Print

The book is based on a series of photographs made by Haser who creates sculptural portraits using origami shapes. These images play with dimension and space through transforming the sitter’s face into geometric shapes and patterns which deconstruct and then reimagine the original photographic portrait.

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Last year the team produced a limited edition of 10 books by hand and this campaign is to raise money to produce the second edition which will expand on the initial ideas. The book will be designed by Emily Macaulay (Stanley James Presswho has worked alongside Haser on the project, and will be accompanied by a story by science writer Piers Bizony, both of whom have helped to introduce a narrative background, layout and unique construction.

Alma hard at work finishing off the last of the Cosmic Surgery Portraits.

Alma finishing off the last of the Cosmic Surgery Portraits.

Page example from the second edition

Page example from the second edition

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The book will be limited to 500 copies and will have a hardcover printed and foil embossed. It will be 190x240mm (slightly smaller than A4) and contain 48 pages filled with the original portraits and a few new ones that haven’t been shown before. There will also be a number of smaller booklets inside, containing the written content. The book will also include a pop-up portrait and a folded one.

To make a pledge and for more information on the Cosmic Surgery Kickstarter campaign.

The Photocopy Club & My Brighton team up for workshop and photocopy exhibition in lobby

GEORGE_TAYLOR

Photograph by George Taylor

If you live or are visiting Brighton this month, why not pop into the hotel lobby of My Brighton and see The Photocopy Club’s, What Brighton Means to Me — a ‘Brighton Hall of Fame’ of pictures taken by local photographers celebrating Brighton’s “unique charm”. The show runs throughout February and features photocopied/Xerox photographs.

DAVID_NEWBY

Photograph by David Newby

The Photocopy Club aims to produce contemporary photographic prints using a technology regarded as “being the most democratic and cost effective”. It will be interesting to see the images in the show and how they look reproduced as black-and-white photocopies, not as photographs.

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Photograph by Sandra Harper

On Saturday 27 February the My Brighton-Photocopy Club partnership will be holding a zine-making and screen-printing workshop at My Brighton on Saturday 27th February. Tickets cost £10. Click here to book.

The zine-making workshop will provide an introduction to the history and cultural significance of zine making. Participants will all create a Brighton zine while The Photocopy Club team will assist with printing and binding styles. The event will also include a screen-printing masterclass where participants are able to create their own screen-print of an iconic Brighton scene.

Interactive storytelling: Journey inside the homes of women living in a Delhi resettlement slum

Bawana JJ Colony by Rajan Zaveri and Kamala Kelkar.

Bawana JJ Colony by Rajan Zaveri and Kamala Kelkar.

Bawana JJ Colony
A new immersive documentary on women’s issues in a resettlement slum in Delhi has been launched using interactive approaches to visual storytelling.

Producer Rajan Zaveri and journalist Kamala Kelkar invite the viewer to embark on an insightful multimedia journey through the area and to explore the homes of four women and their families living there. This documentary is a visceral and educational experience using first-person, fixed 3D perspective and navigation. Furthermore, the four mini documentary interviews give voice to these women’s lives, revealing aspects that are often hidden. The work’s beautiful visual presentation combines with the powerful interviews to give a genuine insight into the plight of the residents. I highly recommend this journey.

Click on this link to enter the interactive documentary: Bawana JJ Colony.

Bawana JJ Colony by Rajan Zaveri and Kamala Kelkar.

Still image from the interactive site Bawana JJ Colony by Rajan Zaveri and Kamala Kelkar.

From the website: “It’s been a decade since many of the families living in this relocation slum were forced out of what used to be Delhi’s biggest shantytown to make way for the 2010 Commonwealth Games.

“Initially, living in a central community called Yamuna Pushta on the banks of the Yamuna River, their homes were demolished because they were said to be polluting the area. They, and many other slum dwellers in the past decade were forced to relocate here, a remote resettlement post located on the outskirts of Delhi, two hours from the city centre.”

Their stories can be seen and heard in greater detail, using the interactive features. Here, four women will show you the struggles they face every day, and how the isolation has changed their lives.

The work is also featured on PRI’s The World as part of its ‪#HerRights‬ series.

 

Empowering Yazidi women through photography UNICEF-supported workshop in Iraq

Bushra, 16, takes a photo of men playing cards in her camp. Photo: UNICEF/Iraq/2015/Mackenzie

Bushra, 16, takes a photo of men playing cards in her camp. Photo: UNICEF/Iraq/2015/Mackenzie

I’ve learned so much. I learned to communicate with people. I’ve built up much more confidence. Now I want to become a photojournalist. Bushra, aged 16.

Another quick post to point you to a UNICEF-supported photography project that aims to empower Yazidi women through photography. These young women are in a camp (near Dohuk in the Kurdistan Region of Iraq) for displaced Iraqis, who have fled the advance of ISIS. The women met every day for two months and were taught photography techniques by two Kurdish photographers.

I’ve just watched a news story about the participants and wanted to share it with you as soon as I could.

Follow this link for more information: Empowering Yazidi Women through photographyThe full article from which the quote is taken is by Lindsay Mackenzie, a consultant with UNICEF Iraq.

Direction donations can be made to UNICEF Iraq: http://www.supportunicef.org/iraq

Follow this link to the article and related videos shown on CNN: Yazidi girls photography refugee camp.