Tag Archives: Laura Noble

Photo Call: L A Noble Gallery launches London Life Photo Competition and last weeks to see Japan Suite by Chris Steele-Perkins

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Two snippets today from L A Noble Gallery: the launch of the gallery’s London Life Competition and a reminder that Chris Steele-Perkins wonderful show, Japan Suite, ends on 1 February. So why not head over to north London and see work by Steele-Perkins who joined the Viva agency in 1976 and Magnum Photos in 1979 – the year that his first monograph, The Teds was published. The book is still available and has since become a classic of British documentary photography.

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Chris Steele-Perkins at L A Noble Gallery opening for Japan Suite

LONDON LIFE COMPETITION
The London Life Photography Competition is open to all and L A Noble Gallery is looking for “dynamic, exquisite, challenging and creative images… that capture the current age of austerity and decadence in all its forms to be included in an exhibition in Summer 2014”.

From the Roaring 1920s to The Great Depression of the 1930s “it was an age of unbelievable wealth, glamour, freedom and decadence where not only artistic, but also individual, expression broke new ground. However, it was also a time of great social upheaval as millions lived in poverty and/or faced persecution on social, political, religious and ethnic grounds. Thus, many parallels can be drawn between this period and today. The spirit of the lifestyle that this ethos encapsulated, serves as an escape from the current economic climate, just as it did in the 1930s.”

Follow this link for details on How to Enter.

PRIZES
All finalists will be featured in the exhibition this Summer.

1st prize
Six months representation with L A Noble Gallery and mentoring with Gallery Director Laura Noble.
Consultation and printing of your gallery portfolio, with a master printer.

2nd and 3rd prize
A two-hour portfolio review with Laura Noble.
Featured prominently in the exhibition.
An annual National Art Pass valid for one year.

COST
£25 for up to four images.

DEADLINE
31 March.

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Photo Talk – Laura Noble on collecting photography, her private collection and the business of photography

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Laura Noble in front of the cover of The Art of Collecting Photographs and a photo by Maeve Berry from her series Incandescence. © iPhone photos Miranda Gavin.

Last week, I caught up with collector, gallerist and writer Laura Noble at her talk for the monthly Photologyy  series on photography. The monthly talks are hosted by Hastings-based Alex Brattell and take place downstairs at the Bullet Coffee House. The following post is a collection of comments and insights from Laura. There is  a 15min audio podcast which I recorded after the talk where I get to probe a little deeper about her flying fascination.

Laura trained as a painter and decided, after completing her studies, that she needed “a library and a studio” and got a job in The Photographers’ Gallery bookshop. She wrote The Art of Collecting Photographs in 2006. Photography entered the art market in the 1970s and photographs gained value and status through creating exclusivity by restricting reproduction. With an endlessly-reproducible medium, such as photography, this is of paramount importance. “That’s the wonderful thing about photography, it’s not just a recording medium now, but an art form.”

“The bulk of my collection is things that fly” – a realisation that helped narrow down her field of collecting. She recalls how her collection of photographs started slowly and how she likes to buy living photographers’ work  – her first buy in 1991 was Hidden by John Kippen. Noble “didn’t spend masses of money to start with” and “rotates the photographs in her home as otherwise she “stops seeing them”. However, when people feature in her collection they “generally have their eyes closed”.

Her first digital work was of the undercarriage of a plane with the LA sky removed. These form part of a series of planes shot and manipulated post production, which “look like pinned butterfly specimens”.

Other works she owns include:

Forbidden Zone by Jonathan Olley, which she describes as “an incredible body of work shot” in the beech and pine forests of Verdun, where some of the First World War’s bitterest battles took place. “They still lose a man a month trying to clear the forest of ammunition and diffuse the bombs.” On his website, Olley writes: Recent estimates made by The French interior Ministry state at least 12 million unexploded shells lie undiscovered in the hills overlooking the City of Verdun.

One of Maeve Berry‘s crematorium photos from her series, Incandescence, which she exhibits on aluminium and Diasec so that the viewer sees themselves.

A photograph from Deborah Baker‘s, In Paradiso series, for which Baker uses digital post-production techniques, for example, montage and layering, using photographs she has taken in the woodland garden she has cultivated for eight years. “The prints are divine,” she adds.

One of Chris Steele Perkins’ photographs from his Japan series, Fuji; a Jeffrey H Short image; a print by Emily Allchurch, from her Tokyo series which pays homage to Utagawa Hiroshige’s, One Hundred Famous Views of Edo (1856-58); and a Mischa Haller print.

Photographers need to have a good working knowledge of the medium and to “know what’s out there” as it is “so easy to do work that has already been done”. Make work long term and keep doing it, she advises. Often it takes someone else to put forward a photographer’s work. “Take a look at your work in a mirror – painters do it all the time,” she adds when discussing composition.

Editioning is useful in photography: “It’s not worth breaking an edition, except if you’re William Eggleston,” she warns. Adding that “you are signing their own death warrant if you break an edition” and “if you want your work to fetch a decent price, you need to create editions”. As to the word giclee, she laughs. “I never use the word. Do you know what it means?” Someone in the audience shouts out “Spurt”.

Click on the play button to hear a 15m 50s long audio podcast with me in conversation with Laura Noble recorded after her talk. Laura talks about what her collection says about her and more…

Photo News – Laura Noble issues open letter about closure of Diemar/Noble photography gallery and launch of new L A Noble Gallery

Today Laura Noble sent out an open letter to her network about the closing of the Diemar/Noble Gallery, billed as “one of the capital’s top spots for photography” (see below). The word was out and about on twitter where followers commented on the demise of the gallery. However, it’s not all bad news as from the ashes new things – the L A Noble Gallery – are created, so I’m sharing the letter with you all:

Dear Friends,

It is with great sadness I write to tell you that, after three amazing years, Diemar/Noble Photography has closed its shutters for the last time. I would like to take this opportunity to thank you personally for your support. Without the patronage of clients and visitors, the enthusiasm of the press and the ambition and talent of our artists, we would not have achieved so much in such a short time.

Diemar/Noble was always more to me than a gallery, it was – and remains – a community. If the legacy of the gallery is to leave even a little more passion and excitement for photography in this City, then it is an achievement I will be very proud of.

Without you sharing in the vision, the gallery could never have hoped to become “one of the capital’s top spots for photography” (Time Out) over such a modest time. I hope you can share my pride in all that the gallery has achieved.

My time as Co-Director at Diemar/Noble has been a life affirming one and deepened my love for all things photographic. The opportunity to explore different avenues in the future may have drawn this venture to a close but my commitment to photography remains and the next chapter promises to build on that. My involvement with photography is an on-going and passionate one. I will continue to carry out portfolio reviews and consultations, lectures for photographers and collectors as well as my other writing and curating projects.

Most exciting of all, I have now established the L A Noble Gallery, which I shall be launching at the Unseen art fair in Amsterdam on the 19th of September. The lauraannnoble.com website will also be launched on the same day.

Now looking forward to my next challenge, I am excited to see what the future will hold for myself, the photographers with whom I work and those exciting new talents we have yet to discover.

I do hope that you will stay in touch and join me for future endeavors.

Yours faithfully in gratitude,

Laura Noble

Photo News – Call for applicants for Tri-pod autumn weekend 8 and 9 September workshop in London

Summer has finally arrived in the UK, or so I believe. I’m here in Prague catching up with myself and getting ready to go back to the UK in full swing. Today’s post is a little self promotion for the creative development workshops that Tri-pod co-founder Wendy Pye and I are holding throughout the year at Photofusion in London.

The format has been tweaked slightly for September’s workshop. We are delighted to be working with Method acting practitioner Sam Rumbelow, see bio, who has worked with Gillian Wearing and will be bringing over 30 years experience to the workshop. If you know anyone who may be interested in the workshop, please forward, or let me know via comments of relevant places to post details.

Tri-pod aims to develop sustainable creative initiatives that are not reliant on funding. We aim to keep costs down while maintaining a professional approach that remunerates all those involved.

(L-R) Tri-pod workshop 2011 at RoofUnit, photo © Wendy Pye; Tri-pod exhibition at Hotshoe Gallery 2011, photo © Phillip Reed

PHOTO PROJECT RESEARCH & DEVELOPMENT
AUTUMN WEEKEND WORKSHOP @ PHOTOFUSION, LONDON
Saturday 8 and Sunday 9 September 2012 from 10.00am-5.30pm

Tri-pod is calling for applicants for its weekend photo project creative development workshop to be held in the studio space at Photofusion in Brixton. The deadline for applications is FRIDAY 24 AUGUST.

About the weekend workshop
Tri-pod takes a holistic approach to building a dynamic and flexible model for working with photographers. This workshop aims to support participants in the development of their work using a variety of different strategies. The weekend engages the support of peers and is for photographers and visual artists using photography who have a lens-based Project in Progress. During the workshop, we will discuss approaches to your working practice, including the various challenges and ‘blocks’ that can prevent a creative project from moving forward.

On Saturday, participants will explore personal development strategies that can be used in relationship to creative potential, facilitated by Miranda Gavin and Sam Rumbelow. On Sunday, participants will receive guidance and feedback in small groups from three industry professionals, Laura Noble, Sue Steward and Miranda Gavin about their personal project.

Tri-pod will be developing a network for its workshop participants and will be offering evening and half-day follow-up sessions for ongoing support later in 2012.

Exhibition opportunity for 2013
In collaboration with Photofusion, Tri-pod will be offering participants a two-person show to be held in the summer of 2013 at Photofusion’s gallery in Brixton. The photographers will be selected from those have attended Tri-pod workshops.

To apply
The workshop is aimed at people who have a personal photography Project in Progress (PiP). It can be a documentary/editorial or art-based body of work. Please note that applicants will need to bring images and if applicable research notes/sketchbook to show over the weekend.

Please email a 150-word maximum overview of the PiP or an artist statement in the body of the email, with a CV attached to: info@tri-pod.co.uk.

Deadline for applications is FRIDAY 24 August
Successful applicants will be contacted on SUNDAY 26 August
Fee: £250.00

About the workshop facilitators
Sam Rumbelow has 30 years experience in the acting industry and is a leading Method acting practitioner in the UK. Sam works with a diverse range of creative practitioners evolving their creative technique and unlocking their true creative potential. He collaborated with Turner-prize winner Gillian Wearing on the critically acclaimed film Self Made and recently gave tailor-made workshops at the Whitechapel Gallery and Hayward Gallery.

Miranda Gavin is a freelance writer specialising in photography, a media trainer and visual creative. As well as her role as deputy editor of Hotshoe magazine and running the Hotshoe Blog, she reviews work, gives talks and is co-founder of Tri-pod.

Laura Noble is a writer, curator, collector and co-director of commercial art gallery Diemar/Noble Photography set up in 2009. She is the author of The Fine Art of Collecting Photography and has key essays in several monographs.

Sue Steward is an independent writer, broadcaster and photo editor. She is the photography critic for the Evening Standard and an occasional arts commentator for radio, as well as judging photo competitions and working on numerous newspapers and magazines.

About Tri-pod
The first Tri-pod project development group was set up in April 2010 by Wendy Pye and Miranda Gavin and ran as a closed, ongoing research and development group over 18 months. This culminated in a group exhibition of participants work Nine-Point Perspective: Ways of Seeing at Hotshoe Gallery, London in August 2011. Tri-pod also hosted their first one-day workshop at RoofUnit Studio, Bethnal Green in July 2011.

Photo news – Tri-pod calls for applicants for its June weekend Photo Project workshop at Photofusion in London

Participants get feedback at Tri-pod’s day workshop at RoofUnit and the exhibition Nine-Point Perspective held at Hotshoe Gallery in summer 2011. Photos  (L-R)  © Wendy Pye and © Phillip Reed.

A little bit of self-promotion today but only a little. Tri-pod – the creative iniative I set up with photographer Wendy Pye – has set up a weekend workshop that could be just the ticket.

Tri-pod is calling for applicants for its weekend Photo Project Research and Development workshop to be held in the studio space at Photofusion in Brixton. The workshop is aimed at anyone who is working on a personal photographic project in progress and who may be having difficulties getting motivated or moving forward,

PHOTO PROJECT RESEARCH & DEVELOPMENT
WEEKEND WORKSHOP @ PHOTOFUSION, LONDON

Saturday 16 & Sunday 17 June 2012
10.00am-5.30pm

About the weekend workshop:
The weekend will be based on the belief that some photographers would benefit from the support of peers and mentors whilst developing a body of work. The aim of the weekend will be to support participants who specifically have a photographic project in progress.

During the workshop, we will discuss approaches to your working practice and the various challenges that can block a project moving forward. There will also be an opportunity, all day on Sunday, to receive personal guidance and feedback from three industry professionals about your project in progress (PiP) in small groups.

Tri-pod will be developing a network for its workshop participants and will be offering evening and half-day follow-up sessions for ongoing support later in 2012.

Exhibition opportunity for 2013:
In collaboration with Photofusion, two participants, selected from those attending Tri-pod workshops, can apply to be included in a two-person show to be held in the summer of 2013 at Photofusion’s gallery in Brixton.

To apply:
This workshop is aimed at people who have a photography Project in Progress (PiP). It can be a documentary/editorial or art-based body of work. Please note that applicants will need to bring images and if applicable research notes/ sketchbook to show over the weekend.

Please email a 150-word maximum overview of the Project in Progress or an artist statement (in the body of the email) with a CV attached to:

info@tri-pod.co.uk

The deadline for applications is Monday 4 June at 5pm. Successful applicants will be contacted on Wednesday 6 June.

Fee: £250.00

About the workshop facilitators:
Miranda Gavin is a freelance writer specialising in photography, a media trainer and visual creative. She is the deputy editor of Hotshoe Magazine, runs the Hotshoe Blog, and is a regular contributor to photo magazines in
the UK and abroad.

Laura Noble is a writer, curator, collector and co-director of commercial art gallery Diemar/Noble Photography set up in 2009. She is the author of The Fine Art of Collecting Photography and has key essays in several monographs.

Sue Steward is an independent writer, broadcaster and photo editor. She is the photography critic for the Evening Standard and an occasional arts commentator for radio, as well as judging photo competitions and working on numerous newspapers and magazines.

About Tri-pod:
The first Tri-pod project development group was set up in April 2010, facilitated by Miranda Gavin and ran as a closed, ongoing research and development group over 18 months, culminating in a group exhibition of participants work at Hotshoe Gallery, London in August 2011. Tri-pod also hosted their
first one-day workshop at RoofUnit Studio, Bethnal Green in July 2011.

*Tri-pod aims to develop sustainable creative initiatives that are not reliant on funding. We aim to keep cost down while maintaining a professional approach that remunerates all those involved.

Link to PDF text-only version with all workshop details:
Tri-pod_workshop_16 and 17 June