Tag Archives: photographer

Help Kickstart Pierfranceso Celada’s book Hitoride, or By Yourself, Alone

After a five-year journey, I am very glad to present the project Hitoride in book form. You can make it a reality by pre-ordering your copy, or getting one of the limited edition offerings.
Pierfranceso Celada

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I get news of a fair few crowdfunding campaigns, some of which are by lesser-known photographers who need support in pushing out their campaigns further. Pierfrancesco Celada‘s Kickstarter is one such campaign. I first came across the project a couple of years ago at a Brighton-based Slideluck event and singled out his work as one of my favourite multimedia pieces in the selection. See previous post about his film Japan I wish I knew your name

Now you can help him produce the book for which he has just eight more days to reach his target. You can make a pledge and/or circulate news of his campaign to others. Follow this link to the Kickstarter campaign page HITORIDE. The book will be printed and distributed from Italy. For this project to receive its funding it must raise at least £12,000 by 9 Dec 2014 18:41. To date he has raised £4,513, so a big push is needed.

japan, I wish I knew your name
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japan, I wish I knew your name

HITORIDE (Literally: By Yourself, Alone) is a photographic book by the Italian photographer and is based on his award-winning project Japan I wish I knew your name. The project reflects on miscommunication and isolation in Japan, one of the most populated countries in the world.

The book will cost £24, plus shipping costs. A selection of five limited edition prints from the project will be available for backers to choose from and will be available in three different sizes.

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Pierfrancesco Celada (b.1979, Italy), after completing a PhD in Biomechanics is now concentrating his attention on a long-term project on life in Modern Megalopolis.In 2011 he won the Ideastap and Magnum Photo Photographic Award and interned at Magnum Photo.  His work has been exhibited internationally and his projects published on Newsweek, Times Lightbox, Amica, D-LaRepubblica among others. He is currently working on the second chapter of Modern Megalopolis: “People Mountain People Sea” exploring life in Chinese Megacities. For enquiries: photo@pierfrancescocelada.com

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The Tokyo-Nagoya-Osaka Megalopolis, also called Taiheiyō Belt is a unique example of urban agglomeration with an estimated population of over 80 million people. Despite this incredibly high number of chances to interact, it seems that society is moving in the opposite direction.

If, in small societies, people have more of an active social role, with multiple connections and greater effect on the community [Eriksen, 2001]; in a larger society some people struggle to communicate with each other, or tend to maintain close contact with only a small number of the closest friends or family members. Some people tend to privilege other communicative systems offered by modern media and communication tools; others have an even more extreme approach.

“Nobody is ‘together’ in his work.” Ueyama Kazuki

Hikikomori (“pulling away, being confined”) is an acute social withdrawal phenomenon; a Japanese term that defines reclusive people who have decided to socially isolate themselves for periods longer then six month; often these time periods can be counted in years or even decades. It is estimated that 1% of the Japanese population may be Hikikomori. The young people portrayed in this project are all members of Newstart, a NPO working with Hikikomori and NEET (people not in education, employment or training) with the purpose of helping them to re-enter society.

japan, I wish I knew your name

All photos © Pierfrancesco Celada.

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Moroccan stylist and photographer Hassan Hajjaj goes pop in The Future of Fashion Show Holland

Khadija Lagnawia, 2013
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Metallic Lambda print on Dibond with wood and found objects, 52.5 x 37 in. Courtesy of the artist and GUSFORD | los angeles

Summer may be on the wane but these bold bright portraits should cheer you up. Thanks to record producer and DJ Mark Moore for pointing me to this recent article on The Huffington Post about 53-year-old multidisciplinary artist Hassan Hajjaj who was born in Morocco and “moved to London in his teens, at the height of the punk craze”.

“For the last 15 years, he’s joined the two cultures, splitting his time between Marrakech and London as he turns out densely textured portrait photography that plays well in the West but requires North African artistry to even exist at all… His subjects are his current friends, who pose and dress in ways that translate into arresting hybrid art.” The Huffington Post

His flamboyant Pop-Up Pop-Art portraits combine elements of the traditional studio portrait with African-inspired textiles and props made from domestic and recycled bottles, tins and packets of food. Hajjaj is a self-taught artist, influenced by hip-hop, reggae and the club scene.

V.B.F., 2013
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Metallic Lambda print on Dibond with wood and found objects, 35.5 x 25.5 in. Courtesy of the artist and GUSFORD | los angeles

His work can be seen in the upcoming The Future of Fashion is Now exhibition on show from 11 October 2014 to 18 January 2015 at Museum Boijman Van Beuningen, Rotterdam, the Netherlands. “The exhibition examines the critical stance that young fashion designers worldwide are adopting with regard to ‘the fashion system’ and the role of clothes in contemporary society. Designers with non-Western backgrounds and designers from countries bordering Europe, where until recently there was little or no tradition of fashion, are actively seeking to transform the fashion system.” From Taymour Grahne Gallery website

Mr J. James, 2013
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Metallic Lambda print on Dibond with wood and found objects, 36.5 x 25 in. Courtesy of the artist and GUSFORD | los angeles.

Photo News: Yaakov Israel wins PHotoEspaña Descubrimientos PHE12 award

The Quest for the Man on the White Donkey, ©Yaakov Israel. Photo courtesy of the photographer.

I’m so happy to report that Israeli photographer Yaakov Israel has won the PHotoEspaña Descubrimientos (PHE12 Discoveries) 2012 Award for his series The Quest for the Man on the White Donkey. As the winner Israel will take part in PHotoEspaña 2013. The Quest for the Man on the White Donkey was the inaugural exhibition in May at Zelda Cheatle and Deborah Goldman’s new gallery Margaret Street Gallery, see images below, including one of Yaakov and his wife Maya. The work is featured in a book of the same name published by Schilt Publishing.

I first saw Israel’s work at Arles photo festival a few years ago and interviewed him for the April/May 2012 issue of Hotshoe. Excerpt from the feature I wrote in Hotshoe April/May 2012: “A quest is a specific type of journey, one that implies a search for something, and is a familiar plot device used in narratives, both visual and literary. As used in the title of Yaakov’s debut monograph, it is a concept that replaced that of the “photographic journey” as the project developed. In tandem with the idea of a quest, there is also a type of storytelling, more akin to that of a parable, flowing through the book. For Yaakov, the turning point came when he met a man on a white donkey in 2006 – four years into the project. “In the Jewish tradition, this man is supposed to be a religious prophet dressed in white robes. Whereas the man I met was a Palestinian farmer who materialized in the Judean desert in 45-degree heat. The encounter had a biblical feel to it and made me realize that I was really on a quest to explore what it means to be Israeli, and for me to live in this country. Up until then I’d just been looking, but once I understood the project – when I could write down what I was looking for – it presented itself everywhere. It didn’t matter where I was.

“Thus, Yaakov also embarks on an internal, psychological quest in his search for self-identity in a fractured and complex cultural context. “The more I worked on the project, the more I understood that it was not just about the geographical or social aspects of contemporary Israel, but also about the myths and the religions, as well as political and human aspects. It’s like I’m looking for something that only exists when I look at it,” he says. The images that are included in the book therefore are ones that represent for him “the journey and the idea of the journey simultaneously – the mental journey, the physical journey, and the idea of the quest”. Miranda Gavin

The jury of Descubrimientos PHE12 consisted of Anne McNeill, director of Impressions Gallery (Bradford, United Kingdom); Markus Schaden, editor and founder of Schaden (Germany); and Roger Szmulewicz, director of the Fifty One Fine Art Photography Gallery(Belgium).  Israel’s porfolio was presented in a review session at Centro de Arte Alcobendas of Madrid during June.

The winners of the last editions of the prize are Fernando Brito,Vanessa Winship, Alejandra Laviada, Yann Gross, Harri Palviränta, Stanislas Guigui, Vesselina Nikolaeva, Comenius Röthlisberger, Pedro Álvarez, Tanit Plana, Sophie Dubosc, Juan de la Cruz Megías, Paula Luttringer and Matías Costa.

Les Rencontres Arles 2010 – A Photo Stroll on the Night of the Year with the Pink Rhino – Day 4

Thanks to photographer Rob Hackman of the Matchbox Gallery (more later in the week), for sharing these wonderful photos from our Night of the Year stroll.

It’s the Night of the Year at Rencontres Arles 2010 and we head for the evening projections taking place in the streets and courtyards just off the town square around the amphitheatre. Along the way, we come across the Legendary Pink Rhino – this is the year of the pink rhino, previous year’s logos have included a cat, cockerel and cucumber. We do our tourist-in-Arles photo shoot and get our intrepid photographer Hackman to snap us aboard the beast. As 2am approaches and we head home, we spot the rhino heading towards the water…

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Spread Some Love and take part in A Photo Student’s Appreciate a Photographer Week

© Miranda Gavin, Dead Roses, Christmas 2009

It may be wet, cold and January but there’s plenty of love in the photography world and it’s time to spread some more around.

I just came across a blog A Photo Student run by James Pomerantz and had to reply to his latest post Appreciate a Photographer Week. James has responded to a new report from Career Cast, Jobs Rated 2010: Ranking 200 Jobs from Best to Worst, by Andrew Strieber. There’s a ranking system for different jobs and points are accrued. As James points out, the job ‘photographer’ comes in at No 126 while ‘photojournalist’ is at No. 189 of 200.  The worst job, at No. 200, is reserved in this report for a Roustabout which is defined as someone who “performs routine physical labor and maintenance on oil rigs and pipelines, both on and off shore”.

When I started out on my photographic journey as a music-mad teen, it was mainly the work of photographers that I came across in newspaper weekend supplements and music papers who inspired me. I would tear out the portraits in New Musical Express or Melody Maker and plaster them on my wall. Album covers were also a great format for photography and I would choose my favourites to display.  At this time, Anton Corbijn, Brian Griffin, Penny Smith (fabulous photo of Paul Simenon from The Clash which was used for the London Calling album) grabbed my interest. Later, I came across Lee Miller, Tina Moddotti, (I was seeking out female role models in photography), Bill Brandt and the Surrealists – all of whom took me on wild visual journeys.

I have commented on the post and will spread some PHOTOGRAPHER LOVE this week. My dedication is to all those photographers and photojournalists who have inspired me and made me think, to the medium that gave me a creative outlet and to photography for leading me to where I am now…