Tag Archives: Photography

The Photocopy Club & My Brighton team up for workshop and photocopy exhibition in lobby

GEORGE_TAYLOR

Photograph by George Taylor

If you live or are visiting Brighton this month, why not pop into the hotel lobby of My Brighton and see The Photocopy Club’s, What Brighton Means to Me — a ‘Brighton Hall of Fame’ of pictures taken by local photographers celebrating Brighton’s “unique charm”. The show runs throughout February and features photocopied/Xerox photographs.

DAVID_NEWBY

Photograph by David Newby

The Photocopy Club aims to produce contemporary photographic prints using a technology regarded as “being the most democratic and cost effective”. It will be interesting to see the images in the show and how they look reproduced as black-and-white photocopies, not as photographs.

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Photograph by Sandra Harper

On Saturday 27 February the My Brighton-Photocopy Club partnership will be holding a zine-making and screen-printing workshop at My Brighton on Saturday 27th February. Tickets cost £10. Click here to book.

The zine-making workshop will provide an introduction to the history and cultural significance of zine making. Participants will all create a Brighton zine while The Photocopy Club team will assist with printing and binding styles. The event will also include a screen-printing masterclass where participants are able to create their own screen-print of an iconic Brighton scene.

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Photofusion contributor – Photography & Censorship, Photobook and Project Reviews

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1914 Emmeline Pankhurst being carried away by Superintendent Rolfe outside Buckingham Palace. 20,000 suffragettes gathered to demand votes for women.

Happy New Year 2016 to you all.

I’m starting the year with a historic photo and a quick catch up of my recent writing over at Photofusion before posting more content. Today I’m pointing you to my bimonthly theme/opinion piece on Photography and the Removal of Images and bimonthly Photofusion Members’ Project Review, plus two, monthly photobook reviews. Follow the links below.

YOU CAN’T SHOW THAT! Photography and the Removal of Images
“At a recent group art exhibition, ironically titled Passion for Freedom held at The Mall Galleries in London, I was handed a sealed envelope by one of the organisers of the event. Inside there was a postcard with a photograph from a series of seven photographic light box images ISIS In Sylvania by London-based artist Mimsy that had been removed because they were deemed by the police to have “potentially inflammatory content”. (continue by following the link).
http://www.photofusion.org/blog-post-photography-and-the-removal-of-images-by-miranda-gavin/

Plus two more photo book reviews:
Photobook #4
Francesca Moore’s self-published book, Bhopal: Facing 30
http://www.photofusion.org/photobook-review-bhopal-facing-30-by-miranda-gavin/

Photobook #5
The new Thames & Hudson book Lee Miller: A Woman’s War by Hilary Roberts.
http://www.photofusion.org/miranda-gavin-photobook-review-5/

Photofusion Members Project Review #1
The first of a bimonthly post, Love Rocks by Amanda Jobson.
http://www.photofusion.org/blog-post-members-project-review-1-by-miranda-gavin/

Photo Show Stroll – Lee Miller: A Woman’s War IWM London

Miller’s most important legacy is without doubt her photography of the Second World War. Hilary Roberts, Research Curator of Photography, IWM.

As promised, here is a Photo Stroll through the exhibition Lee Miller: A Woman’s War at the Imperial War Museum in London. The show runs until 24 April 2016 and is billed as “a new major exhibition of 150 photographs depicting women’s experience of the Second World war by acclaimed photographer Lee Miller.”

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The photos may not be in chronological order, all have been taken with my iPhone and are an attempt to capture the journey and the atmosphere of the show. Walking through the show with my mum, my impression was of a city street taking me on a journey back to past eras—pre-Second World War, Wartime Britain and Europe and Post-Second World War. Set against muted red, grey, blue and green walls the various photos, paintings, objects, audio, film, text panels, pull quotes and glass-fronted vitrines, not dissimilar from shop-front window displays, encourage the viewer to look inside and out, to left and right, above and around corners, and to reflect on the women whose lives were affected.

Observations from my mum: “Incredibly interesting shots and angles; the intimacy of daily life such as a photograph of women’s pants and stockings hanging on a washing line which a male photographer would not have taken; the use of light; the naturalness and the breadth of the work both in image and text”.

The United States War Department accredited 127 woman as official war correspondents during the war, of these only four were photographers: Lee Miller, Margaret Bourke-White, Dickey Chapelle and Toni Frissell. I didn’t know of the last two women so now it’s time to do some more research.
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From the press  release: “2015 marks 70 2015 marks 70 years since the end of the Second World War. When war broke out in 1939, women embarked on a continuous process of change and adaptation. For some, including Miller herself, the war brought a form of emancipation and personal fulfillment, but its many privations caused widespread suffering. Miller’s photography of women in Britain and Europe during this period reflects her unique insight as a woman and as a photographer capable of merging the worlds of art, fashion and photojournalism in a single image.

“Lee Miller: A Woman’s War will trace Miller’s remarkable career as a photographer for Vogue Magazine and for the first time will address her vision of gender. Miller was one of only four female professional photographers to be accredited as US official war correspondents during the Second World War.
Recognised today as one of the most important female war photographers of the twentieth century, through her work Miller offers an intriguing insight into the impact of conflict on women’s lives, detailing their diverse experiences and her own world view.

“Comprising four parts, this exhibition will document Miller’s evolving vision of women and their lives as she travelled between countries before, during and in the immediate aftermath of the Second World War.

Women before the Second World War considers the origins of Miller’s wartime vision of women and her evolution as a photographer in the years preceding the Second World War; drawing on early life experiences, such as childhood trauma, her brief career as a fashion model, her involvement in the Surrealist art movement, the influence of early mentors such as Man Ray, and her two marriages.

Women in Wartime Britain explains how Miller, in her new role as photographer for British Vogue,documented the gradual but inexorable transformation of women’s lives in wartime Britain between 1939 and 1944. Illustrating how wartime privation and suffering was offset, in some cases, by enhanced opportunities outside the home.

Women in Wartime Europe examines Miller’s coverage of the impact of war on women in Europe as a US official war correspondent for Vogue magazine, 1944 – 1945, highlighting the diverse and distinctive nature of women’s experience of liberation, defeat and military occupation. Here the exhibition considers the emotional and physical toll of war on women, including Miller herself, reflecting too on the capacity of war in the front line to temporarily dissolve established divisions between the sexes.

Women after the Second World War focuses on Lee Miller’s coverage of women in Denmark, Austria, Hungary and Romania in the immediate aftermath of war, contemplating the lasting legacy of war, the difficult process of recovery from wartime experiences and the adjustment to post-war changes.

The show is sponsored by Barclays and produced in collaboration with the Lee Miller Archives. See my previous post for photos and the Audio Interview I did with Hilary Roberts, Curator of Photography at IWM, and Lee Miller’s son Antony Penrose at the press preview.

Empowering Yazidi women through photography UNICEF-supported workshop in Iraq

Bushra, 16, takes a photo of men playing cards in her camp. Photo: UNICEF/Iraq/2015/Mackenzie

Bushra, 16, takes a photo of men playing cards in her camp. Photo: UNICEF/Iraq/2015/Mackenzie

I’ve learned so much. I learned to communicate with people. I’ve built up much more confidence. Now I want to become a photojournalist. Bushra, aged 16.

Another quick post to point you to a UNICEF-supported photography project that aims to empower Yazidi women through photography. These young women are in a camp (near Dohuk in the Kurdistan Region of Iraq) for displaced Iraqis, who have fled the advance of ISIS. The women met every day for two months and were taught photography techniques by two Kurdish photographers.

I’ve just watched a news story about the participants and wanted to share it with you as soon as I could.

Follow this link for more information: Empowering Yazidi Women through photographyThe full article from which the quote is taken is by Lindsay Mackenzie, a consultant with UNICEF Iraq.

Direction donations can be made to UNICEF Iraq: http://www.supportunicef.org/iraq

Follow this link to the article and related videos shown on CNN: Yazidi girls photography refugee camp. 

 

Photo Stroll: Two Top Picks teamLab and Liane Lang at START Art Fair Saatchi Gallery London

The second year of the START Art Fair (10-13 September ) EMERGING ARTISTS NEW ART SCENES at the Saatchi Gallery in London opened to the public on Thursday and runs until tomorrow.

Though photography made up a smaller percentage of the art works, there were some strong, engaging and beautiful works on show.

teamLab’s Flutter of Butterflies beyond Borders is a Top Pick, not least because it is an immersive, enchanting, beautiful, and clever installation It was a hit with so many people at the press opening, including myself. So much so that, I joked with one of the Japanese creators,  a humble self -effacing man, Takasu Masakazu (Catalyst) that I wanted to live there. According to Masakazu less than 20, but more than 10 projectors have been used to create the work. For me, it is a work to be experienced rather than written about. Visit the teamLab website for more.

Liane Lang’s body of work, Saints, shown by LOEWE Contemporary, was selected by START’s Fair Director Niru Ratnamshown as a solo presentation in the This is Tomorrow section of the art fair.  “The section focuses on artists whose work is rooted in the contemporary either through the way they work, their subject matter or the context in which they work.” (from press release).

I have been following her work for years now and gave her the Hotshoe Photofusion Award in 2012, so I was delighted to see her included as one of the 12 solo artist presentations. Visit Liane Lang‘s website for more.

I will post further images tomorrow showing the cross section fo work on display. For now, here’s a taster of my Two Top Picks.

teamLab

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