Category Archives: HotShoe magazine

Photo Competition: Visual artist Lucia Pizzani and filmmaker David Jackson win Hotshoe Photofusion Award 2014

Now in its fifth year, I was delighted to announce the winners of the Hotshoe Photofusion Award 2014 at the gallery last week (11 December) with a short comment on the work, which I have reproduced below. The winners are:

LuciaPizanni
Lucia Pizzani for her Impronta series 2013 of ink-jet prints derived from the wet-plate collodion process. The work is a hybrid of sculpture, performance and photography and engages with the idea of the chrysalis on a number of levels, including its physical form through the use of specially-made chrysalis costumes. This series of delicate and slightly bizarre black-and-white images recalls the style of 19th-century Victorian ethnographic portraiture and suggest women on the verge of emerging, as well as ideas of metamorphosis and transformation. (photo above © Lucia Pizzani)

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David Jackson, This Is Not My House is a short film of 14 minutes shot in Malta and centred on the filmmaker’s widowed father. Gentle and beautifully crafted, the film avoids the usual clichés and instead offers a series of tenderly stitched vignettes that give a sense of the now increasingly solitary life of his ageing father. At one point in the film there is a short exchange between father and son, who also share the same first name, that conveys so much about their relationship and a growing similarity in mannerism, posture and even dress. (film stills above © David Jackson)

The winner/s receive a feature (in this case I have interviewed the winners for a post next week) on http://www.hotshoeinternational.com, and a free annual magazine subscription. Previous winners received a feature in the magazine but since it has changed to a quarterly frequency, this is no longer the case.

Since I started judging the selection in 2010, there have also been changes in the way the award is organised. For the first two years, I judged the winner from a shortlisted selection of six photographers and visual artists on show at the gallery. Since 2012, Photofusion has organised a salon-style hang showing single images from its members and this year for Photofusion SALON/14 there were over 1200 images from 140 artists.

People often ask me about judging photo competitions and in an early post, Discovering Your Competitive Side, I talked about how I select work. This year, as in previous years, I asked Photofusion to send me a folder with all the entries stripped of the photographer’s name so that I only have a number for each entry, plus an artist statement and CV with the names removed. In my line of work, there is, inevitably, work that I may recognize, but that is the nature of photo competitions so I try to maintain as much parity in judging the work as I can.

I like to look at the work first, reflect on it, return to it, and see which images stay in my mind over a couple of days. I also read the artist statement once I have looked at the images, not before, as they can help anchor the work, point to conceptual aspects that may not be gleaned solely by looking at the work, and suggest points of investigation by the photographer. Lastly I look at the CV, although in most cases I do not refer to this at all. I am only interested in the work submitted and supporting statements or captions, it makes no difference to me whether someone studied at the Royal College of Art, or a lesser-known institution or whether the entrant is self-taught. For me, it is about the work, not the perceived pedigree.

I then whittled 100 folders of single images down to a longlist of around 20, for which I requested any further images by the photographer who was, at this stage, named. For those of you who are interested here is the longlist:

Wendy Aldiss; Valerie Bennett; Tom Broadbent; James Clark; Scarlett Crawford; CJ Everard;  Gabriella Fabrowska; Keith Greenouth; Robert Hackman; Grace Hardy; Esme Horne; Aron Klein-Barge; Lucy Levene; Emilia Moisio; Vincenzo Sassu; Heather Shuker; Emma Evelyn Speight; Nai Wen Hsu; Remy Whitling

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Guest Blogger 5 – Forward Thinking: Hotshoe looks ahead to 2013 on the World Photography Organisation blog

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Hotshoe covers from 1980s to present day

For my final guest post before Christmas at the World Photo Organisation and to mark the end of the year and the start of a new one, I asked the team at Hotshoe magazine to look ahead to 2013, rather than back at 2012, to comment on any trends in the world of photography and to pick out some up-coming events, photographers and works to look out for.

If you ever wondered who we were and about the history of this independent publication (first published in 1979) then follow this link Forward Thinking for some photos, comments and photos. There’s also a pre-Christmas competition to win a year’s subscription to Hotshoe magazine, just LIKE Hotshoe International Facebook page this week, see the end of the WPO post for details.

Enjoy the run up to the holidays and here’s wishing you all a healthy, happy holiday.

Photo News – Hotshoe magazine for contemporary photography Dec/Jan out now in print and as app

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Featuring: Leigh Ledare testing the boundaries of relationships, sex and love in Double Bind; Alinka Echeverria’s documentary on the birth of South Sudan; Diana Scherer‘s Nurture Studies; Asger Carlsen‘s Hester; and Fleur van Dodewaard in Crude Metaphors. Plus reviews of Alec Soth‘s Looking for Love, 1996, Klein + Moriyama at Tate Modern, and the Nikon D800. As well as, A.D. Coleman’s Letter from New York, a round up of the latest books, exhibition listings, news and more.

Subscribe for Print or your iPad/iPhone.

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EXCLUSIVE APP CONTENT:
Alan Spearman’s film of the streets of South Memphis ‘As I Am’, Viviane Sassen’s ode to her muse Roxane and a review of this year’s Paris Photo. Plus enriched portfolios, clickable exhibition listings and much, much more.

SPECIAL OFFER:
If you subscribe to Hotshoe International’s print edition during December, we’ll send you a free copy of our Oct-Nov issue as an early Christmas present.

Photo News – New issue of revamped Hotshoe App Edition for iPad and iPhone is out now

Great! by Photobooks
Great mag, really like the content, hadn’t seen any of it before, cool design too. Highly recommend

Fantastic! by Jenna Banat
Highly recommend this magazine app – really nice layout, easy to navigate through and fascinating content!
Readers comments from iTunes site


The second edition of the revamped Hotshoe App Edition is out.

Browse all the content from the bi-monthly print edition  showcasing the latest in contemporary photography presented as a curated, interactive experience:

  • Extended portfolios
  • Interactive exhibition listings
  • Text-only function and cutting-edge articles and reviews
  • The latest multimedia pieces from the most exciting photographers around.

Hotshoe’s App Edition is available on your iPad and iPhone from the iTunes store. Download the app for free and then subscribe for one year for just £9.99, and get the latest issue of Hotshoe directly to your device every other month.

Photo News – Datacolor hosts free webinar on monitor calibration tonight from 7-8pm

If you want to know more about monitor callibration then sign up to Datacolor’s free webinar tonight from 7pm-8pm (GMT) Zurich, Switzerland.

The Monitor calibration is a short and easy tutorial providing photographers and creative professionals, from amateur to a professional level, with an in-depth lesson on how to calibrate their personal monitor/s to achieve truthful colours, so that photography can be displayed as the artist intended.

The online educational tutorial covers topic including:
How to ensure that your monitor is a reliable window to your digital photography
How to match monitor and printer output
How to create the best working environment for post-production.
The webinar also includes tips and tricks from Datacolor’s top imaging expert Oliver Mews.

Go to Datacolor and complete a short registration form.

So why is it important to know about monitor calibration? “Since no two devices display the exact same colour, precise calibration is imperative in order to ensure consistent, true colour representation. In addition, even calibrated monitors will gradually decrease in accuracy over time, requiring colour calibration every one to two months in order to display sharp, accurate colours, shadows and highlights.” (from the press release).