Tag Archives: Miranda Gavin

Keep Photofusion Moving: support the crowdfunding campaign now

Anthony Carr, Big Bar Lake Ranch Revisited, 2014

Anthony Carr, Big Bar Lake Ranch Revisited, 2014

Today I want to point readers to a crowdfunding campaign for Photofusion photography centre in Brixton London that is very dear to my heart. To date, the campaign is currently at £28,185 of a target of £40,000 with 29 days but we still need to push for more as it’s an all-or-nothing-campaign and ends on 2 June at 16.25.

There have been 212 backers so far including renowned photographer Wolfgang Tillmans who pledged an amazing £1,500 last week. If the momentum keeps up at this rate Photofusion’s campaign should meet its target but we need to keep letting people know. So please share this post and the campaign link: Keep Photofusion Moving.

Today I’m going to Photofusion to be filmed on camera regarding why I think Photofusion is important. That’s easy to answer, particularly as I have been involved with the organisation in a variety of capacities over the last decade.

I judge the annual Hotshoe Photofusion award—now in its seventh year— and via this have supported a number of emerging photographers who are also members of Photofusion. The winners from 2010-2015 are:

Anthony Carr (2015)
Lucia Pizanni (2014)
Katerina Mudronova (2013)
Liane Lang (2012)
Chloe Sells (2011)
Odette England (2010)

Photofusion is a hub, a place to meet, to take risks, to experiment, to discuss and to create. It has a mentoring and professional programme, SELECT and has hosted numerous exhibitions by many, now well-known, photographers in the early days of their career. I have also delivered and chaired talks, have been writing for its website and use the darkroom and digital scanning facilities to create personal work.

Please spread the word, share this campaign and Keep Photofusion Moving.

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Impronta series, 2103 by Lucia Pizanni, Collodion wet plates on aluminium

 

 

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Photofusion contributor – Photography & Censorship, Photobook and Project Reviews

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1914 Emmeline Pankhurst being carried away by Superintendent Rolfe outside Buckingham Palace. 20,000 suffragettes gathered to demand votes for women.

Happy New Year 2016 to you all.

I’m starting the year with a historic photo and a quick catch up of my recent writing over at Photofusion before posting more content. Today I’m pointing you to my bimonthly theme/opinion piece on Photography and the Removal of Images and bimonthly Photofusion Members’ Project Review, plus two, monthly photobook reviews. Follow the links below.

YOU CAN’T SHOW THAT! Photography and the Removal of Images
“At a recent group art exhibition, ironically titled Passion for Freedom held at The Mall Galleries in London, I was handed a sealed envelope by one of the organisers of the event. Inside there was a postcard with a photograph from a series of seven photographic light box images ISIS In Sylvania by London-based artist Mimsy that had been removed because they were deemed by the police to have “potentially inflammatory content”. (continue by following the link).
http://www.photofusion.org/blog-post-photography-and-the-removal-of-images-by-miranda-gavin/

Plus two more photo book reviews:
Photobook #4
Francesca Moore’s self-published book, Bhopal: Facing 30
http://www.photofusion.org/photobook-review-bhopal-facing-30-by-miranda-gavin/

Photobook #5
The new Thames & Hudson book Lee Miller: A Woman’s War by Hilary Roberts.
http://www.photofusion.org/miranda-gavin-photobook-review-5/

Photofusion Members Project Review #1
The first of a bimonthly post, Love Rocks by Amanda Jobson.
http://www.photofusion.org/blog-post-members-project-review-1-by-miranda-gavin/

Photo Stroll – Julian Germain The Future is Ours: Classroom Portraits 2004-2015 Towner Eastbourne

… the power of the images is in their direct connection to the viewer. We remember our own schooldays and wonder what happened to our own classmates. By presenting different pupils, different schools, different year groups, Germain asks questions about contemporary educational practices and social divisions. Already we can imagine the life trajectories of some of these young people. Here are faces full of hope and promise. Here also, is the silent threat of failure. Aspiration competes with apathy …” Tom Shakespeare. Archive Magazine, October 2005

JULIAN GERMAIN THE FUTURE IS OURS: CLASSROOM PORTRAITS 2004-2015 

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Julian Germain at the Towner PV for The Future is Ours: Classroom Portraits 2004-2015. © iPhoto Miranda Gavin

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Towner executive director Emma Morris introduces Julian Germain’s show. © iPhoto Miranda Gavin

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The audience at the opening for Julian Germain’s classroom portraits. © iPhoto Miranda Gavin

Today I am posting some photos taken on my iPhone from the opening night of British photographer and artist Julian Germain‘s The Future is Ours: Classroom Portraits 2004-2015, a major exhibition at the Towner art gallery in Eastbourne, East Sussex running until 10 January 2016. This body of work began in schools in North East England in 2004 and was extended to schools throughout the UK the following year. Since 2005 the archive has grown to include schools throughout Europe, the Middle East, Africa, Asia, South East Asia, North and South America, and a special commission for this exhibition, four Eastbourne schools that Germain visited and photographed in July.

The Future is Ours: Classroom Portraits 2004-2015 is a long-term project exploring universal themes of school and childhood from 19 countries worldwide and is thus a global archive documenting 461 school classrooms. Using his own photography technique, he captured the students in the natural environment of their classrooms and also canvassed some of the pupils about their lives. His work resulted in the publication Classroom Portraits 2004-2012 (now out of print) and an exhibition at Nederlands Fotomuseum, Rotterdam.

This carefully curated show is the UK premiere has been put together so that wherever the viewer stands when walking through, there are a number of points of visual interest. It was no surprise to learn, during director Emma Morris’ speech, that Germain was heavily involved in the curation of the show and went to the gallery every day, spending a week on making decisions as to how to hang the photographs and place related objects. The exhibition displays 200 objects including framed photographs, films, prints, Polaroids, and customised books. The show also includes books, graphs indicating the students likes and dislikes and daily habits, and projected imagery.
All iPhone photos below ©Miranda Gavin

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Lucy Grace Griffiths beside her favourite classroom portrait taken in a classroom in Bangladesh from Julian Germain’s exhibition. © iPhoto Miranda Gavin.

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Photofusion contributor Say Hello to Me on the website

This is a quick post to point any readers here to my contributions over at Photofusion Photography Centre’s website. I will be writing monthly photobook reviews, bimonthly theme/opinion pieces, and bimonthly Members’ Project reviews. My first theme/opinion piece will go live online on Monday 2 November.

Here is the link to my Introduction:

http://www.photofusion.org/photofusion-contributor-miranda-gavin/

Here are the links to my monthly photobook reviews:

http://www.photofusion.org/miranda-gavin-photobook-review-1/

http://www.photofusion.org/miranda-gavin-photobook-review-2/

http://www.photofusion.org/miranda-gavin-photobook-review-3/

I decided to choose three books for October from The Photographers’ Gallery bookshop where I will, as regularly as I can, source books. For next month, I will be reviewing a book of my choice as well as a Photofusion Members’ self-published book. So look out for those from November 10 next month.

Photo competitions report from Miranda Gavin’s talk at Photofusion Brixton

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David Titlow’s winning portrait, Konrad Lars Hastings Titlow, for the Taylor Wessing Photographic Portrait Prize 2014

Today’s post focuses on entering photography competitions and is a report by photography graduate Jess Morris from my recent talk, Discovering Your Competitive Side, which took place at Photofusion in Brixton.

In keeping with the theme of the talk, this post opens with David Titlow’s winning portrait (Konrad Lars Hastings Titlow) from the prestigious Taylor Wessing Photographic Portrait Prize 2014 which was announced last week. His portrait Konrad Lars Hastings Titlow was captured the morning after a large midsummer party in Rataryd, Sweden. It shows his baby son being introduced to a dog. He says: ‘Everyone was a bit hazy from the previous day′s excess – my girlfriend passed our son to the subdued revellers on the sofa – the composition and back light was so perfect that I had to capture the moment’.

This year the competition attracted over 4,000 submissions in the form of editorial, advertising and fine art prints; an exhibition of sixty shortlisted photographs including the four prize winners as well as the work of the winner of the John Kobal New Work Award, Hana Knizova (Portrait of Olivia Colman) can be seen until 22 February 2015.

David Titlow (b. 1963) is a London-based photographer working in fashion and advertising. He has exhibited widely and has been commissioned by numerous magazines and newspapers, including The Guardian, The Sunday Telegraph, Vice and Vanity Fair. Originally a musician from Halesworth in Suffolk, Titlow switched to photography in the early nineties and has since worked in the industry.

NPG x139974; Olivia Colman by Hana Knizova

Hana Knizova, Portrait of Olivia Colman. C-type colour print, 16 October 2014. 16 1/2 in. x 23 1/4 in. (418 mm x 592 mm) image size Commissioned, 2014

Miranda Gavin – Discovering your Competitive Side
Tuesday 16 September, Photofusion – Brixton

Jess Morris reports from the event and from her perspective as one of the audience.

As well as being a well-respected name in the photography world, Miranda Gavin, who is editor-at-large for Hotshoe, editor of Frame & Reference and The Roaming Eye, also has personal experience of being on the judging panel of photographic competitions.

This makes her an invaluable asset to the circle of freelance up-and-coming photographers trying their hand at entering the unknown, and often unfair, world of competitions. Brixton’s Photofusion invited her along to share her knowledge and advice with its members.

Miranda opened the talk with a quiz to spark audience participation, not to mention wake everyone up after a long day in the rat race. We split into small groups and chose one person to take note of our answers. Listed here are the questions she asked us, along with a selection of answers from around the room:

Why bother entering competitions?
E x p o s u r e
To raise your profile/Publicity/Elevation/cutting corners
Gives you a project/Target/Challenge/Makes you finish it
Contacts/Gain experience/Feedback
Tutoring
M o n e y £££££!

How do you find out about them?
Online/Mailing Lists/Repeat notifications from previous competitions
Word of mouth/Networking/University Alumni
Advertisements/Posters/Flyers/TV

Name the ones you have heard of/entered (in order of popularity):
Taylor Wessing Photographic Portrait Prize
British Journal of Photography photo prizes
Photofusion’s AMPS annual photo prize
Terry O’Neill Photographic prize
Prix Pictet
Portrait Salon
Nikon competitions
World Press Photo
Wildlife Photographer of the Year
Sony World Photography Award
Landscape Photographer of the Year
Association of Photographers prizes
TRIBE

As well as listing some of the reasons for entering photography competitions, Miranda also urged us to note down the negative aspects and the flaws. The general consensus was as follows:

Work goes into the ether – with no explanation of where it has gone or who has seen it.

Costs – some competitions are charging an extortionate rate per photo for entering without any guarantee of the photograph being returned or properly looked after.

Lack of feedback – If you don’t get through to the final rounds or win, you at least want feedback from the judging panel on whether they liked certain aspects of your work, or what you could have improved on. If no reasons are given the disappointment is far greater.

No communication after payment is taken – This truly leaves a bitter taste and gets you thinking that they were only after your money in the first place, plus WHERE does the money in entry fees go?

Lack of clarity in criteria – You can’t be judged harshly for not ticking invisible boxes! It is not always clear.

Unfair judging – Often the judges have no artistic background whatsoever and are merely there because of sponsoring or circumstance; for example, the Taylor Wessing prize includes a member on the judging panel from the law firm sponsoring the prize.

Celebrity/already established winners – Seeing the same names, or same circles of winners, is neither promising or inspiring for prospective entrants.

The second half of the talk focused on an interesting topic, that of crowd funding, a platform many photographers are now using to get their work out there, as well as to fund work. Crowdfunding is the funding a project or venture by raising small amounts of money from a large number of people via the Internet. One woman in the audience made the point that she tried raising £2,000 through crowdfunding to make a video. However, she found it problematic because she ended up having to put her own money in to reach the full amount which was misleading and defeated the object entirely. Some platforms only give you the money if you reach your full target.

The same woman also noted a positive aspect that it’s not just about the money, it’s also about raising awareness and appreciation of work or projects with followers and contributors, of whom she had gained plenty. Miranda brought up an example of a project that was crowdfunded successfully and managed to raise awareness of autism and in turn allowed the photographer to self publish a book. There were certainly pros and cons involved in equal measures, however, generally the feeling was that crowdfunding was an alternative method to entering competitions in terms of offering elevation, money, experience and networking, however, it required a lot more effort and time to achieve it.

Crowdfunding requires full time dedication during the campaign period (often of 90 days). However, as Miranda pointed out, TIME is a huge factor. It may be a more tangible way of achieving a goal with a clear objective, but photographers have to commit to it. For those who cannot dedicate themselves and the necessary time to crowdfunding, competitions are still an option.

It was time for the audience to turn the questions on Miranda, eager to find out about her personal judging experience of being on a panel and what information she could divulge about the dialogue that goes on behind the scenes. Miranda said that when judging work herself she prefers it if the names of entrants are stripped off the work, as well as from CVs and personal statements. This is so that she cannot be influenced by someone’s history, education or presence in the art world already. Anonymity is crucial.

In terms of information, Miranda explained how she likes to read any statements or  descriptions after looking at the image, and to test herself on how well she can read its meaning without one, however, in some cases the statement may be vital and a necessary component of the work. In terms of writing statements to accompany entries, Miranda said that a concise statement, or around 200 words, is enough and to bear in mind the audience reading the statement, so nothing too theoretically heavy or filled with jargon. If a theory is being referred to, or a quote is used, she likes to see the photographer demonstrate how it relates to the work, otherwise it is decoration.

LESS IS MORE: This is crucial to remember when choosing your final selection. Only submit your best shots.

BELIEVE IN YOUR WORK: The work you submit should also be work that you feel strongly about, perhaps a recent body of work that you are still passionate about and connected to as this will come across to the judging panel.

FIT THE CRITERIA: Make sure your work meets the criteria.

CHECK TERMS & CONDITIONS: Read the small print and beware of rights grabs.

LABELLING IS VITAL: The order of your series is important and how it is viewed by judges.

VARIETY OF SCREENS: Check your images on a range of screens if you are sending in an online file, find a balance that will work on most screens.

RESEARCH competitions and previous finalists and winners to see a range of styles and formats that are being accepted. This is not to copy them but to merely get an idea of whether your work could stand alongside some of them.

MOVING IMAGE WORK
Miranda also talked about the complications of submitting different mediums of work. Moving image artists need to be aware of lazy curation or lack of appropriate funds/space to show it. The whole piece can be mistranslated if it’s not shown appropriately and with the necessary settings. You have to be in control of how your work is shown otherwise it is almost pointless. How can you take control? The only way really is to always include guidelines on how you want it to be viewed and hope that they are suitably followed.

By the end of the talk and after giving a summary of the key areas covered, the audience seemed more enlightened on the subject and, possibly, more realistic about what they’re really getting when entering a photography competition. That’s not to say people were put off from doing so, but instead they were a little wiser about the process and better informed about the negative aspects. For the people who may enter their work after attending this talk, it’s fair to say that they would be doing so with somewhat of a better chance of succeeding than before, or at least better informed.